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Is dissolution right for you?

August 15, 2018


Ending a marriage is an emotional experience, but it does not have to be a traumatic one. Dissolution is a viable alternative to divorce, which gives you and your soon-to-be ex the ability to make your own decisions. Although it may seem impossible, many people in Tennessee prefer to have the last say over things rather than have their future in the hands of a judge.

So what is a marital dissolution agreement? It is an alternative dispute resolution, a concept you may already be familiar with. Mediation and negotiation are more commonly recognized alternative dispute resolutions. In a dissolution you will address all of the necessary topics you would commonly see in divorce. These include:

  • Asset division
  • Child custody
  • Child support
  • Alimony

Family law judges are important, but they are only human. They can render a divorce decision based off what they learn about you from documents and testimony, but will they understand the time you put into refurbishing a table before giving it to your ex in property division? Or do they realize that you prefer driving the smaller vehicle even though the title is officially in your ex’s name? These are small yet important factors that affect your future.

Dissolution gives you the ability to exercise more control over the end of your marriage. However, Tennessee family law can be complicated, and while you might know what you want, getting it down in an agreement that abides by the law is not always easy. Most couples who choose the dissolution route do so with experienced counsels on their side. This ensures that everybody’s best interests and rights are respected and that the agreement abides by the law.

Disclaimer

The information you obtain at this site is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation. We invite you to contact us and welcome your calls, letters and electronic mail. Contacting us does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please do not send any confidential information to us until such time as an attorney-client relationship has been established.